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$20,000 write off is only available for small business, unless… Posted on October 9, 2018

Asset-write-off

Everyone assumes that the $20,000 instant asset write-off is exclusive to eligible small businesses. But it is possible, under certain conditions, for individuals such as employees to be able to claim the write-off for depreciating assets used in producing non-business assessable income – such as employment or investment income. The questions and answers below tease out the situations where this may be applicable.

Isn’t it only small businesses that are eligible for the $20,000 write-off?

Yes, that’s right. The instant asset write-off, which is part of the simplified depreciation regime, is only available to a taxpayer that is a “small business entity”. A taxpayer is a small business entity if both of the following are satisfied:

  • the taxpayer carries a business in the current year, and

  • the taxpayer’s aggregated turnover was less than $2 million in the previous year, or is likely to be less than $2 million for the current year.

The legislation leaves no doubt that only a small business can utilise the write-off.

So how can an employee claim the deduction?

An employee taxpayer is eligible for the write-off as long as they are also a small business entity.

In other words, the individual’s status as a small business entity allows them to use the $20,000 write-off. The fact that the taxpayer is also an employee is not material.

Isn’t the $20,000 write-off only for assets used in the small business?

Actually, no. The law is more generous with regards to this.

The small business can deduct the cost of the asset for the income year in which it starts to use the asset, or has it installed ready to use, for a taxable purpose.

The law does not restrict the concept of a “taxable purpose” only to purposes related to the business that is carried on. In fact, the expression “taxable purpose” is defined in the capital allowances rules as a very broadly stated purpose – the purpose of producing assessable income.

Income from employment (salaries and wages, commissions, bonuses, allowances, and so on) is generally assessable income.

Therefore, the cost of a depreciating asset can be immediately deducted in the year incurred if:

  • the taxpayer is a small business entity

  • the first element of the cost base (that is, the amount you paid for the asset) is less than $20,000, and

  • the asset is held for the purpose of producing any type of assessable income – whether the income is business, employment or investment income.

Where the asset is held only partially for an income-producing purpose, a corresponding proportion of the asset’s cost will be deductible.

Remember that the instant write-off is only available if the total cost of the asset is less than $20,000, and not just the taxable purpose portion of the cost.

Case Study

Rosarla “carries on a business” from home as a sole trader, and meets the conditions to qualify as a “small business entity” in relation to her business activities.

Rosarla is also employed part-time by a company as a member of its management team. Due to her family responsibilities and business activities, she works in the company’s offices only two days a week. On the days when she is not in the office, she fulfills her duties from home.

During 2015-16, Rosarla purchased a new desktop computer for her home for $5,000. Her records show that she uses the computer 70% for employment duties and 30% for personal purposes. She continues to use her old laptop for her home business activities. The new computer is not used for the home business at all.

In her 2015-16 tax return, Rosarla will be able to claim a total of $3,500 for the new computer under the instant asset write-off (70% of $5,000). Despite the fact that she does not use the computer in relation to her small business, she is eligible for the deduction because:

  • she is a small business entity (in relation to her home business), and

  • she holds the computer partly for a taxable purpose (being the purpose of deriving assessable income from employment).

Small business entity pooling

The above commentary only looks at how the $20,000 write-off can be applied to assets used for deriving non-business income – as long as the taxpayer is a small business entity by virtue of their business activities. The same analysis applies to the general small business pooling regime within the simplified depreciation system. That is, a small business entity taxpayer may pool assets held for a “taxable purpose”.

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talk to us Discover the difference that the right advice can make

Get in touch with our team today and learn how you and your business can grow to the next level. From structuring to sustainability, we'll help you reach your financial goals and live the lifestyle you deserve.

be better off.